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Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)

Segregation of Women and Aboriginal People Within Canada's Forest Sector by Industry and Occupation [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2006

"This study examines employment segregation by gender and by Aboriginal ancestry within Canada's forest sector in 2001. Results show that while gender segregation was principally by occupation, segregation by Aboriginal ancestry was principally by industry sub-sector. White women were over represented in clerical occupations and Aboriginal men were over represented in woods based industries. Patterns of employment for Aboriginal women differed from those of both Aboriginal men and white women."

Economic Development and Innu Settlement: The Establishment of Sheshatshit [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)

"This paper documents the circumstances surrounding the comparatively recent settlement of the nomadic Inn of Labrador in a central community. State and health officials and agents of the church at the time initiated programs that focused on economic rehabilitation, formal education and health concerns which they felt would assist in integrating Innu into Canadian industrial society. Ultimately Innut had little choice but to comply with the wishes of these officials and settle when confronted with the difficulties of pursuing traditional practices."

Challenging the Deficit Paradigm: Grounds for Optimism Among First Nations in Canada [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2001

"In contrast to the deficit paradigm's view of First Nations as victims beset with numerous problems e focus on positive developments for First Nations in Canada since the 1969 White paper. Four areas are examined: self-government, organizational capacity, structures of opportunity, and resistance to oppression. A profound transformation of the First Nation sociological landscape is observed as First Nation interests have become vested in the Canadian state, marginalization has diminished substantially, and structures of opportunity have opened."

Forging Aboriginal / Non-Aboriginal Partnerships: The Joint-Venture Model [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)

"With greater control of capital and resources, many Aboriginal people are gaining the capacity to enter into joint ventures. This is a model of economic partnership with non-Aboriginal society which has been increasingly used in recent years. This paper seeks to generate discussion by raising fundamental questions about the roles of Aboriginal people and the benefits to be derived by them."

The Paq'tenkek Mi'kmaq and Ka't (American Eel): A Case Study of Cultural Relations, Meanings, and Prospects [Canadian Journal of Native Studies, CJNS]

Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Native Studies (CJNS)
Year of publication: 
2004

"The Mi'kmaq have a deep and rich relationship with Ka't (American eel - Anguilla rostrata). While the Mi'kmaq continue to harvest Ka't for food, their relations with and use of eel also embody important cultural meanings and practices. Ka't occupies a notable place within many ceremonial settings, is used for medicinal purposes and, as a consequence of the ways in which Ka't is shared, is central to traditional relations of reciprocity. Implications for the revitalization and empowerment of Indigenous cultures are drawn from the lessons evident in this case study."

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by Dr. Radut