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Webinar: Highlighting Successful Atlantic Indigenous Businesses [Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program, AAEDIRP]

Publisher: 
Atlantic Provinces Economic Council
Year of publication: 
2019

Webinar on APC 2019 Report: Highlighting Successful Atlantic Indigenous Businesses

Indigenous businesses in Atlantic Canada are making a sizeable contribution to the regional economy and are expanding rapidly, but financial obstacles remain a significant barrier to their future growth.

Infographic: $1.6 Billion of Indigenous business revenue…and Growing Rapidly (+137% since 2012) [Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program, AAEDIRP]

Publisher: 
Atlantic Provinces Economic Council
Year of publication: 
2019

Infographic for APC 2019 Report: Highlighting Successful Atlantic Indigenous Businesses

The purpose of the study was to highlight Atlantic Indigenous business success stories and how these can inform and assist further growth.

This study shows that Atlantic Indigenous business revenues were valued at $1.6 billion in 2016. Indigenous firms are growing rapidly, creating jobs and income for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous workers. APEC’s report highlights factors that could further their growth.

Policy Brief: Highlighting Successful Atlantic Indigenous Businesses [Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat, APCFNC]

Publisher: 
Atlantic Provinces Economic Council
Year of publication: 
2019

Policy Brief for 2019 APC Report: Highlighting Successful Atlantic Indigenous Businesses

Indigenous Economies, Theories of Subsistence, and Women: Exploring the Social Economy Model for Indigenous Governance [American Indian Quarterly, AIQ]

Publisher: 
American Indian Quarterly (AIQ)
Year of publication: 
2011

"The article consists of three sections. The first section discusses definitions and contemporary significance of subsistence and indigenous economies. It questions the prevailing narrow, economistic analyses and interpretations of subsistence. Although economic development projects such as resource extraction may improve fiscal independence and strengthen the economic base of indigenous communities, they also present serious threats to indigenous economies. The second section examines the relationship between subsistence and wage labor, particularly from the perspective of women.

Aboriginal Women's Community Economic Development: Measuring and Promoting Success [Institute for Research on Public Policy, IRPP]

Publisher: 
Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)
Year of publication: 
2007

"In this study, Isobel Findlay and Wanda Wuttunee explore innovation in Aboriginal women’s community economic development (CED) in Canada. Their research is centred on three case studies of successful CED in urban, rural and remote settings. The stories of the dedicated women who have made a significant mark within their communities show that it is possible to pursue business objectives while living the values of their culture and assuming their rightful place in the community. In this context, the authors critique current approaches and tools for measuring the impact of CED.

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by Dr. Radut