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The Economics of First Nations Governance Investment Capital, Money and Wealth Accumulation [National Centre for First Nations Governance]

Publisher: 
National Center for First Nation Governance (NCFNG)
Year of publication: 
2006

"Poverty is still the norm for most of Canada’s First Nations, despite ongoing efforts over many years to stimulate reserve economies, including significant investment by governments trying to ‘prime the economic pump’. There are, however, some good examples where the pattern has been changed and communities are breaking the chains of poverty. There are lessons to be learned from both within Canada and outside as to what can be done to alleviate poverty and stimulate economic growth.

Creating Wealth in Aboriginal Communities [The Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2005

"Aboriginal leaders are determined to make their communities self-reliant by reducing their high unemployment and their dependence on government. They are doing that by creating wealth and employment through community-owned enterprises. Using case studies, Creating Wealth and Employment in Aboriginal Communities discusses six key factors that contribute to the success of Aboriginal community-owned enterprises."

Aboriginal People in Canada's Labour Market [Caledon Institute of Social Policy]

Publisher: 
Caledon Institute
Year of publication: 
1999

"Using data from the 1996 Census and the 1991 Census-based Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this report compares the job situation of Aboriginal people to that of the general population. The Aboriginal identity population (i.e., people who see themselves as Aboriginal) grew by 33 percent between 1991 and 1996, as opposed to just 6 percent for the non-Aboriginal population. Much of this growth is the result of the very "young" age profile of the Aboriginal population. In 1996, 35 percent of the Aboriginal identity population was under 15, compared to 20 percent for the whole population.

Digging Beneath the Surface of Aboriginal Labour Market Development: Analyzing Policy Discourse in the Context of Northern Alberta's Oil Sands [Aboriginal Policy Studies, APS]

Publisher: 
Aboriginal Policy Studies (APS)
Year of publication: 
2011

"This paper provides an analysis of policy discourse as it concerns Indigenous labour market development in Northern Alberta. In the process, the authors unearth the manner in which current federal and provincial government policy obscures a long history of attempted colonial domination with respect to Indigenous peoples in Canada more generally. Typically, economic booms are spoken of as an opportunity to democratize labour opportunities, through the discourse of “partnership” and “social inclusion” in particular.

Career Progression Factors of Aboriginal Executives in the Canada Federal Public Service [Journal of Management Development]

Publisher: 
Journal of Management Development
Year of publication: 
2003

"The research examined the career progression factors of Aboriginal executives in Canada's federal public service to determine whether such factors as development opportunities, job assignments, education levels, mentoring, leadership experience, and networking increase the advancement of Aboriginal people to the executive category within the Canadian federal public service."

Stretched Beyond Human Limits: Death by Poverty in First Nations [Canadian Review of Social Policy]

Publisher: 
Canadian Review of Social Policy
Year of publication: 
2012

"Indian” policy in Canada has been historically based on the objective of assimilating the Indigenous population. There has been recent movement to create policies that support First Nations’ self-governance, yet, the Indian Act and its related policies have not been amended to reflect this change. Thus federal policy now hovers between the two conflicting objectives. The result is chronic poverty in First Nations, a worsening problem that has stymied federal policymakers."

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples: Economic Development [Library and Archives Canada]

Publisher: 
University of Saskatchewan
Year of publication: 
1992

Chapter 5: Economic Development - from the Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Includes the proceedings, comments and reports.

Aboriginal Economic Development: Overview [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
1999

"What we have established in this paper is that the economic state of Canada's first peoples today is deplorable, that the costs of the status quo to the public purse are high and rising, and that any costs incurred by the federal government in addressing these problems are a lot more affordable today than was the case just a few years ago. We have also provided a brief outline of the economic strategy recommended by RCAP."

The Constitutional Right of an Enriched Livelihood [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2004

"Aboriginal peoples of Canada already possess the assets they need to make a sustainable treaty economy. These assets are held in defective administrative forms by federal, provincial, and territorial governments. Moreover, these governments take most of the tax revenue and all the surplus value. Treaty beneficiaries need to rethink Canada and take on the world, rediscovering and unleashing the economic potential in the treaty economy to create sustainable development and sustainable communities."

The Challenges of Aboriginal Economic Development in the Shadow of the Borg [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2004

"There has been a great deal of development and change in Aboriginal communities since 1966, the year the Hawthorn Report was released. The Hawthorn Report examined about 17 different Indian communities across the country and documented their social and economic conditions in the early 1960s. The report lays out contemporary social thinking about how these communities ought to be developed and what strategies the Government of Canada ought to follow. The report's main idea is to treat Indians as citizens plus.

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by Dr. Radut