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Economic Development

True to Their Visions: An Account of 10 Successful Aboriginal Businesses [Conference Board of Canada]

Publisher: 
Conference Board of Canada
Year of publication: 
2009

"Aboriginal business development is a growing trend in Canada that is improving the socio-economic outcomes for Aboriginal peoples by creating jobs and wealth in their respective communities and Canada at large. Aboriginal entrepreneurs are not only making a difference, but making a profit and creating jobs as well. True to Their Visions: An Account of 10 Successful Aboriginal Business sets out to determine the factors that determine whether a business will succeed or fail.

Performance Measurement, Development Indicators and Aboriginal Economic Development [Center for Community Enterprise]

Publisher: 
Center for Community Enterprise
Year of publication: 
2002

"This report defines the language of outcomes, indicators, and performance measures and then summarizes a review of applications of several strategies and tools for tracking progress that have been developed since the late 80s. It then reviews the current performance measurement practice of Indian and Northern Affairs at the policy, program, intermediary, and community level. The results demonstrate a confused, wholly inadequate approach to the application of indicators and performance measures at every level.

Doing Community Economic Development [Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives, CCPA]

Publisher: 
Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
Year of publication: 
2007

"Challenging traditional notions of development, these essays critically examine bottom-up, community economic development strategies in a wide variety of contexts: as a means of improving lives in northern, rural and inner-city settings; shaped and driven by women and by Aboriginal people; aimed at employment creation for the most marginalized. Most authors have employed a participatory research methodology.

The Income Gap Between Aboriginal Peoples and the Rest of Canada [Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives, CCPA]

Publisher: 
Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
Year of publication: 
2010

"This study breaks new ground by examining data from Canada’s last three

Social Capital and Aboriginal Economic Development [University of Toronto]

Publisher: 
University of Toronto
Year of publication: 
2003

"I suggest that geographical isolation segregates individuals and communities from linking and bridging networks; reliance on bonding networks in such locales often results in limited access to financial and human resources. In places where networks extend beyond the community, larger pools of resources are accessed. The dissertation highlights, however, the potential detrimental role that such external networks can play in the family lives of marginal communities.

Bonding Social Capital in Entrepreneurial Developing Communities - Survival Networks or Barriers? [Journal of the Community Development Society]

Publisher: 
Journal of the Community Development Society
Year of publication: 
2004

"This paper focuses on the interaction between social capital and entrepreneurship in Aboriginal communities in Canada. Using statistical and interview data from three First Nations communities in northern Ontario, I examine if and how bonding networks turn into tangible resources for business development. The paper also highlights ways in which community relationships hinder entrepreneurship and turn into barriers to economic development.

Living rhythms: Lessons in Aboriginal economic resilience and vision [McGill-Queen's University Press]

Publisher: 
McGill-Queen's University Press
Year of publication: 
2004

"There are few works on economic development among Canada's Aboriginal. Living Rhythms offers a current perspective on indigenous economics, planning, business development, sustainable development, and knowledge systems. Using a series of cases studies featuring Aboriginal communities and organizations, Wanda Wuttunee shows that their adaptations to economic and social development are based on indigenous wisdom and experience.

Business Mind of the Economic Warrior [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2004

"For me, it is most important that we honour the things that we as Aboriginal people can bring to the business table. I do not think that the mainstream has a lock on the best way to do business. The best way is for us to learn and share together. We have to take time to reflect on our decisions to enter into the mainstream economy. The costs and implications must be clearly understood for us in relationship to our visions that we have for our communities. That was really very nicely set up at the beginning of the conference.

Partnering Among Aboriginal Communities: Tribal Councils Investment Group (TCIG) [Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development, JAED]

Publisher: 
Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development (JAED)
Year of publication: 
2002

"In keeping with the goal of sustainability, the First Nations of Manitoba identified a need for an investment vehicle that would allow them to participate in economic initiatives on a larger project-level than could be achieved by individual communities. By working together, they could access the capital necessary to build a capital pol that would then be available for further investment. The profits return to communities for use in whatever way they choose. The vehicle formed to meet these goals is Tribal Councils Investment Group (ICIG)"

Success factors of Aboriginal women entrepreneurs: a study of Mohawk community in Canada [International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, IJESB]

Publisher: 
International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business (IJESB)
Year of publication: 
2006

"Research in indigenous entrepreneurship as well as women and entrepreneurship is growing. This paper presents 11 case studies on women Aboriginal entrepreneurs in Quebec, Canada. For Aboriginal peoples, small business and entrepreneurship is intimately linked to community and cultural survival. Within these communities, women assume major roles and are active participants and leaders in politics and in business. This research examines several models of entrepreneurship – traits, behavioural and environmental.

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by Dr. Radut